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Migrant Walk 

-Necessity obliges us to leave-

Paper sculptures

 

240x180cm

192 pieces of 15x15cm

Acrylic painted on wood 

2021

This work recreates the journey of migrants who cling to the ideal of a better life.

October 2018 a flyer with a man carrying his backpack and open arms began to circulate on social networks in Honduras. It was the first massive call to join a migrant caravan. “We are not leaving because we want to. Violence and poverty expel us”.

The migrant caravan convened through social networks in a massive way is a relatively new phenomenon that arises specifically in Honduras. This movent invites other migrants, in their wake, to join this procession to become together a mass that breaks any siege and guarantees their right to emigrate in a "safety" way from criminal groups and system repression on their way to "a new life".

The migrant walk today becomes tangible evidence of a great humanitarian crisis caused by corruption, insecurity and  impunity of many governments (especially in Central America) that end up granting concessions to transnational  corporations, agreements that reinforce the privileges of the spheres of power and the free operation of organized crime.

Necessity obliges us to leave

 

Here we were born and from here we will go

necessity obliges us to leave

 

Violence. Poverty. Injustice

 

the non-existent future obliges us to leave

to the south?

to the north?

 

we are in the middle

we inhabit the hips

of this raped and devastated continent

 

rulers, entrepreneurs, interventionism

they have extracted 

the maturity from our land 

the vitality from our bodies

fracking, mining, murder

necropolitics stalking the Abya Yala

 

we are tired of knowing 

that justice is politicized and 

gives protection to the friends of power

we are tired of waiting for tomorrow 

it seems to never come for us

 

necessity obliges us to leave

to arrive or to die

 

in any case escape

migrate together 

to be a mass of humanity 

 

a migrant walk 

that finally 

gets us to a better life

Rosamaría Bolom, 2021